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At the CHESS Users meeting in June, a two day introduction to FEpX (a crystal-based elastic plastic finite element code) was held at CHESS. This school is part of the new Insitμ (Integrated Simulation and Interrogation Tools and Training for μmechanics) center at CHESS. The first day began with CHESS workshop I entitled Structural Materials Opportunities for Combining Polycrystal Modeling and High Energy X-rays http://meetings.chess.cornell.edu/UserMeeting2014/workshops.html#Workshop1. Cornell Professor Paul Dawson (author of FEpX), Todd Turner of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson AFB, Romain Quey from Ecole de mines Etienne, France and Andy Poshadel from Cornell each gave presentations highlighting the use of finite element models together with High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXD). CHESS GRA Matt Kasemer then led the twenty-five school attendees through the steps of creating a crystal-based finite element mesh representative of an HEXD diffraction volume then loading the virtual sample and conducting post-processing operations to understand the state of each crystal. The new Insitμ center will focus on combining the HEXD techniques developed at CHESS and being used employed at beamlines A2 and F2 with the enormous utility of computational mechanics. Professor Dawson and Matt Kasemer have installed FEpX on the CHESS computer farm – the students actually ran their simulations on the farm experiencing the power of parallel processing. Each student will retain the ability to conduct simulations remotely for 3-4 months by logging in using their CHESS accounts. By all accounts the FEpX school was a success. Based on the success of the school, Insitμ will be planning additional training events in the very near future.

 

 

Submitted by: Matt Miller, CHESS, Cornell University
06/28/2014